Mystical Mythology of the World

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FAERIES 'FAIRIES'

Fairies are supernatural beings and can best be described by the Greek word daimon, which means "spirit". They are not divine (god or goddess), in the usual sense of the word, yet oftentimes they are classified as minor divinities. In fact, in many cultures, the dividing line between fairy and "god" is very thin and the two are often hard to differentiate.  

The name fairy comes from the Old French word faerie and has been extensively overused, as it has come to encompass a wide variety of supernatural beings.

Today, when we think of fairies, we visualize them as tiny, gossamer creatures, with wings that glow in uncommon light. Many times we think of them as possessing some sort of strange magical powers. General traits include a fondness for pranks, a willingness to help, and a kind, pleasing, personality. In nursery book mythology, they are the personification of Providence. However, the term fairy also has a sinister side and in many areas of the world, such as Great Britain, more often than not, the word is used to describe a supernatural being with an evil demeanor.

Fairies can be found in every corner of the world and in every size, shape and form! The good ones have names such as fairies, elves, elle-folks, and fae; the evil ones are urchins, redcaps, ouphes, ell-maids, and ell-women, to name a few.

AMERICAN FAIRIES IRISH FAERIES
BRITISH FAERIES JAPANESE FAERIES
CELTIC FAERIES NORSE FAERIES
CORNISH FAERIES PERSIAN FAERIES
FAIRY CLIPART ROMAN FAERIES
FRENCH FAERIES RUSSIAN FAERIES
GERMAN FAERIES SCOTTISH FAERIES
GREEK FAERIES SPANISH FAERIES
ICELANDIC FAERIES WELSH FAERIES

FAIRY FACTS:

  • Tinkerbell: Created by author JM Barrie, she inhabited Neverland with the Lost Boys in his famous tale of Peter Pan.
     
  • Oberon and Titania: The fairy king and queen of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.
     
  • The Tooth Fairy: The creature who arrives in the night to take milk teeth left under children's pillows, leaving money in their place.
  • Sugar Plum Fairy: In folklore they are rarely seen and then only at dawn. They were the inspiration for Tchaikovsky's The Nutcracker Suite.
  • Mavis Cruet: The fat fairy who couldn't fly, part of the now cult children's TV show Wilo the Wisp.
Variants: Fae, Faerie, Fai, Faierie, Faiery, Fair, Fairye, Farie, Fary, Fay, Fayerie, Fayery, Fayry, Fee, Feiri, Fery, Fey, Feyrie, Feyrye, Phairie, Pharie, Pherie (from the Latin: Fata "Fates")

Where the bluebells and the wind are,
Fairies in a ring I spied,
And I heard a little linnet
Singing near beside.

Where the primrose and the dew are,
Soon were sped the fairies all:
Only now the green turf freshens,
And the linnets call.


Walter de la Mare, Bluebells



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